Juiceman JM480S Juicer Review

Posted by on Sep 26, 2012 in Juice Extractor Reviews | 0 comments

Juiceman JM480S Juicer Review

An in-depth review on the Juiceman jm480s All-In-One 800w Juicer. Read more to find out if this juicer is worth purchasing.

The Juiceman JM480S all in one juice extractor is a medium level juicer. It has these manufacturer specifications:

  • 800 watts of power—1.1 HP!
  • High/low speed control
  • 3” wide-mouth feed chute
  • Extra-large integrated pulp container
  • Custom juice pitcher
  • Snap-up juice spout
  • Small & large food pushers
  • Stainless steel mesh filter
  • Security locking side latches
  • Built-in cord storage
  • Dishwasher-safe removable parts
  • Custom cleaning brush
  • Citrus juicer attachment:
  • 2 juicing cones—small & large
  • Automatic juicing action

The JM480S (made by Intertek) all in one juicer is actually two machines in one, a juice extractor and a citrus juicer, which can be adapted for either applications with the included attachments. Whats novel about the Juiceman juicer is the ability to change to either a citrus juicer or a regular juice extractor with the swap of a few parts. Its has a small footprint, since it is engineered with an integrated pulp container, and also has the versatility of operating with two speed settings. But is the Juiceman JM480S juicer actually worth consideration? Read more to find out.

Juiceman JM480S Unboxing:

Included with the juicer is everything you hope a juicer would include. Brush (although a little cheapy), decent juice container, and all the attachments you need to run the extractor. For the purposes of this review, I will not be reviewing the citrus juicer attachment and instead just focus primarily on the juice extracting functionality.

Juiceman JM480S all in one juice extractor

Juiceman JM480S all in one juice extractor

The shredding disc/mesh screen is only slightly larger than the waring pro shredding disc/screen (which is pretty tiny).Which tells me this unit is not meant for serious juicing, but is geared for rather light/small one person individual portions.

Juiceman JM480S shredding disc and mesh screen

Juiceman JM480S shredding disc and mesh screen (left), vs the waring pro version (right)

Much like the waring pro juicer, the JM480S utilizes an integrated pulp container instead of the more common separate bucket-type used by other higher capacity juicers (like the Jack Lalanne Power Juicer Ultimate).

Juiceman integrated pulp container

Juiceman integrated pulp container

The feed chute is a nice 3″ wide, but it still requires one to quarter and core the apples (coring the apples is optional but I like to do it…those pesky seeds!). At least one doesn’t need to cut the apple into eighths like with the waring pro.

Juiceman extractor chute

Juiceman extractor chute

Juiceman JM480S Operation:

Using the JM480S extractor was a decent experience, I didn’t have any “wow” first impressions other than it had two speeds (for a juicer this compact). It performed well with the mean green recipe, and actually seemed to propel the celery, kale, and cucumbers by itself. I noticed there was very little effort involved in pushing down the ingredients, and the apples were no exception (which I was initially expecting it to do), there were no stoppages or slowdowns. Overall this juicer eats veggies quite nicely, much better than the waring pro, jack lalanne power juice ultimate, and any of the target (bella, dash – both made by Intertek) juicers.

Juiceman JM480S integrated pulp container

Juiceman JM480S integrated pulp container

Low Speed:

First I tested the juicer on the slowest speed. There was a little vibration on use, but nothing which caused me any apprehension. When juicing the kale, I noticed that the base of the juicer would rotate when I pushed in a branch. The torque of the juicer coupled with its lighter weight would cause the base to rotate slightly when a stationary object like the kale branch would hit the shredding disc. It was not really an issue, but I would still need to adjust the base every so often so the spout would pour into the juice container so it would not spill on the subsequent kale insertions.

Noise Level on low speed:

I found the noise level was acceptable and not obnoxious or excessively loud.

Sound clip on low (Taken from 6ft away using the Tascam DR-100mkII at level 6.5 and High Gain.)

 

Efficiency on low speed:

The Juiceman JM480s did a decent job in juice output with a total of 28oz (juice output depends on many variables, such as water content of vegetables, and efficiency of the juicer). In order to test efficiency, I run the pulp output from the first pass through again to see how much juice it still contains. On very inefficient machines, the pulp will still be wet and contain a substantial amount of juice (on my Waring Pro, it gives me anywhere between 8-16oz!)…Turns out this juicer is about average in juice waste efficiency.

JM480S output

JM480S output

The second pass netted me about 5oz of juice. Doing some simple math, I found that the amount of juice this extractor will waste is about 17.85%. Thats not terrible, but definitely not great.

Juiceman juice output 2nd pass

Juiceman juice output 2nd pass

High Speed:

Next I set up the juicer to juice the mean green recipe once more, but on high speed. The results were a bit smoother as I did not have to adjust the base from it rotating unintentionally when inserting kale or any other vegetable into the chute. The higher speed made quick work of the kale, celery, apples, cucumber, and ginger with no hesitations, jamming, or weird vibrations. It was a  pleasant and physically easy experience. Better than my Jack Lalanne!

Noise Level on High Speed:

The noise and vibration were not much of a problem, and I felt comfortable using the JM480S appliance. Impressions were average if not favorable.

Sound clip on high (Taken from 6ft away using the Tascam DR-100mkII at level 6.5 and High Gain.)

 

Efficiency on High Speed:

Next was to find if the efficiency on high speed was comparable to the units low speed output. I typically dont like to use the high speed setting on juicers as it ejects lots of the pulp AND juice content…meaning much higher juice wastage. What I found was that the high speed performed almost identically to the low speed setting. I got a total of 32oz (output varies according to ingredients and juicer efficiency).

JM480S juice output on high speed

JM480S juice output on high speed

On the second pass, I got a total of 6 oz. So doing more simple math, I calculated that on high speed, the juicer will have a slightly worse (but really negligible), juice waste of 18.75%. I was surprised that the juicer still maintained a fairly consistent efficiency even on a higher rotational speed. I was expecting waste to be 20% or higher!

JM480s juicer second pass of pulp

JM480s juicer second pass of pulp

Juiceman JM480S Cleanup:

Cleaning the Juiceman extractor turned out to be pretty intensive. The parts were complex and contained a number of crevices,  nooks, and crannies which water/juice/debris could find its way into. The first area of this was the food pusher. While a nice feature, the small food chute which accepts a food pusher insert allows moisture from juicing to enter in. It would therefore need to be cleaned with each use.

Juiceman JM480S Food pusher

Juiceman JM480S Food pusher

The next area of concern I encountered was with the integrated pulp container and body housing. Why would a juicer contain so many flanges and tiny areas to clean!? As seen below, there are three main sections, which means 6 total vertical surfaces to clean (and only on the inside portion!). Even using my bottle brush (which always makes cleaning easier), I wasn’t able to thoroughly clean the unit. Instead I had to resort to using the supplied toothbrush, and a scouring pad to get into each nook and cranny. This meant three total tools to clean one individual part. Not good. Cleanup took about double the time it normally takes me to clean a juicer.

Juiceman JM480S pulp container

Juiceman JM480S pulp container

Cleaning the other parts were pretty typical and I did not encounter any notable cleanup issues with the rest of the Juiceman appliance.

Juiceman JM480S Conclusion:

For me, the dealbreaker on whether or not a juice extractor is recommended is with the units efficiency and ease of cleanup. If the juicer performs well on average but is a pain to clean, I would look elsewhere. There are plenty of machines which have designs which minimize cleanup, maximize usability, AND produce decently efficient machines. This cuts prep time (3 inch chute), improves usage (no jamming), and lowers total time spent juicing (cleanup).

The Juiceman JM480S is a machine which felt average to me. Its noise levels were not too high nor low, it had some vibration but was not excessive. The unit also had a few quirks with torque on low speed, but it wasn’t something to really complain about. It was a well built machine, and I admired the low footprint of its compact design. Juice output waste efficiency was average at best, but the dealbreaker for me was the difficulty in cleanup.

No unit should have so  many troublesome parts which slow down the cleanup process. Juicing is really 20% juicing and 80% cleanup! Unless you really NEED the citrus juicing conversion capability that this juiceman all in one can provide, I would steer clear and look for a juicer which facilitates easy cleaning, as cleaning is a major factor whether or not the appliance will be repeatedly used in the future…who wants to spend their entire day at the kitchen sink?

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